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Osteological connexions of the petrosal bone of the extant Hippopotamidae Hippopotamus amphibius and Choeropsis liberiensis
Maëva Orliac, Franck Guy and Renaud Lebrun
Keywords: Artiodactyla; bulla; ear region; pygmy hippo; sinus

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.1.e1

  Abstract

    This project presents the osteological connexions of the petrosal bone of the extant Hippopotamidae Hippopotamus amphibius and Choeropsis liberiensis by a virtual osteological dissection of the ear region. The petrosal, the bulla, the sinuses and the major morphological features surrounding the petrosal bone are labelled, both in situ and in an exploded model presenting disassembly views. The directional underwater hearing mode of Hippopotamidae is discussed based on the new observations. 

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Published in Vol. 01, Issue 01 (2015)

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The petrosal bone of Prodremotherium sp. (Artiodactyla, Ruminantia).
Alexandre Assemat and Nicolas Brualla
Keywords: Late Oligocene; MP 26; MP 28; periotic bone; ruminant

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.2.e1

  Abstract

    This project presents the 3D models of two isolated petrosals from the Oligocene locality of Pech de Fraysse (Quercy, France) here attributed to the genus Prodremotherium Filhol, 1877. Our aim is to describe the petrosal morphology of this Oligocene “early ruminant” as only few data are available in the literature for Oligocene taxa. 

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Published in Vol. 01, Issue 02 (2015)

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3D fossil reconstruction related to the publication: Body shape and life style of the extinct rodent Canariomys bravoi from Tenerife, Canary Islands.
Jacques Michaux, Lionel Hautier, Rainer Hutterer, Renaud Lebrun, Franck Guy and Francisco García-Talavera
Keywords: Canariomys; Canary Islands; Fossil reconstruction; Insularity; Rodentia

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.1.e3

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D reconstruction of Canariomys bravoi, described and figured in the following publication: Michaux J., Hautier L., Hutterer R., Lebrun R., Guy F., García-Talavera F., 2012 : Body shape and life style of the extinct rodent Canariomys bravoi (Mammalia, Murinae) from Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain). Comptes Rendus Palevol 11 (7), 485-494. DOI: 10.1016/j.crpv.2012.06.004
      

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    Canariomys bravoi TFMCV872-873 View specimen

    M3#6_TFMCV872-873

    This file contains the 3D reconstruction of Canariomys bravoi, described and figured in the following publication: Michaux J., Hautier L., Hutterer R., Lebrun R., Guy F., García-Talavera F., 2012 : Body shape and life style of the extinct rodent Canariomys bravoi (Mammalia, Murinae) from Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain). Comptes Rendus Palevol 11 (7), 485-494.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf6  




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Published in Vol. 01, Issue 01 (2015)

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Holotype specimen of Donrussellia magna, an adapiform primate from the early Eocene (MP7) of Southern France
Anusha Ramdarshan, Marc Godinot, Samuel Bédécarrats and Rodolphe Tabuce
Keywords: Adapiformes; Early Eocene; Holotype; Primates; Southern France

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.2.e2

  Abstract

    This project presents a µCT dataset and an associated 3D surface model of the holotype of Donrussellia magna (UM PAT 17; Primates, Adapiformes). UM PAT17 is the only known specimen for the species and consists of a well-preserved left lower jaw with p4-m3. It documents one of the oldest European primates, eventually dated near the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum. 

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    Donrussellia magna UM PAT 17 View specimen

    M3#17_UM PAT 17

    3D surface file model of UM PAT 17 (type specimen of Donrussellia magna), which is a well preserved left lower jaw with p4-m3. The teeth (and roots) were manually segmented.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf17  




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    M3#18_UM PAT 17

    CT Scan Data of Donrussellia magna UM PAT 17. Voxel size (in µm): 36µm (isotropic voxels). Dimensions in x,y,z : 594 pixels, 294 pixels, 1038 pixels. Image type : 8-bit voxels. Image format : raw data format (no header).

    Type: "3D_CT"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf18  




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Published in Vol. 01, Issue 02 (2015)

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3D model related to the publication: The inner ear of Megatherium and the evolution of the vestibular system in sloths.
Guillaume Billet, Damien Germain, Irina Ruf, Christian de Muizon and Lionel Hautier
Keywords: bony labyrinth; inner ear; Megatherium; Sloth

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.2.e3

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D model described and figured in the following publication: Billet G., Germain D., Ruf I., Muizon C. de, Hautier L. 2013. The inner ear of Megatherium and the evolution of the vestibular system in sloths. Journal of Anatomy 123:557-567, DOI: 10.1111/joa.12114

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    Megatherium americanum MNHN.F.PAM276 View specimen

    M3#14_MNHN.F.PAM276

    This model corresponds to a virtually reconstructed bony labyrinth of the right inner ear of the skull MNHN-F-PAM 276, attributed to the extinct giant ground sloth Megatherium americanum. The fossil comes from Pleistocene deposits at Rio Salado (Prov. Buenos Aires, Argentina). The bony labyrinth of Megatherium shows semicircular canals that are proportionally much larger than in the modern two-toed and three-toed sloths. The cochlea in Megatherium shows 2.5 turns, which is a rather high value within Xenarthra. Overall, the shape of the bony labyrinth of Megatherium resembles more that of extant armadillos than that of its extant sloth relatives.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf14  




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Published in Vol. 01, Issue 02 (2015)

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3D model related to the publication: Small suids (Mammalia, Artiodactyla) from the late Early Miocene of Turkey and a short overview of Early Miocene small suoids in the Old World.
Maëva Orliac, Levent Karadenizli, Pierre-Olivier Antoine and Sevket Sen
Keywords: Ça nkiri-Çorum Basin; Central An atolia; Hyotheriinae; new species; Suidae

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.2.e4

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models described and figured in the following publication: Orliac M.J., Karadenizli L., Antoine P.-O., Sen S. 2015. Small suids (Mammalia, Artiodactyla) from the late Early Miocene of Turkey and a short overview of Early Miocene small suoids in the Old World. Paleontologia electronica 18(2): 18.2.30A: 1-48 

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Published in Vol. 01, Issue 02 (2015)

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3D model related to the publication: First record of the family Protocetidae in the Lutetian of Senegal (West Africa)
Lionel Hautier, Raphaël Sarr, Fabrice Lihoreau, Rodolphe Tabuce and Pierre Marwan Hameh
Keywords: Innominate; Protocetid; Senegal

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.1.e2

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D model described and figured in the following publication: Hautier L, Sarr R, Lihoreau F, Tabuce R, Marwan Hameh P. 2014. First record of the family Protocetidae in the Lutetian of Senegal (West Africa). Palaeovertebrata 38(2)-e2 

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    indet. indet. SN103 View specimen

    M3#5_SN103

    SN103, partial left innominate. Age and occurrence – Taïba Formation, Lutetian of the near Taïba Ndiaye, quarry of the Industries Chimiques du Sénégal (ICS)

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf5  




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Published in Vol. 01, Issue 01 (2015)

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3D models related to the publication: Morphology of the human embryonic brain and ventricles
Naoki Shiraishi, Airi Katayama, Takashi Nakashima, Naoto Shiraki, Shigehito Yamada, Chigako Uwabe, Katsumi Kose and Tetsuya Takakuwa
Keywords: human brain; human embryo; magnetic resonance imaging; three-dimensional reconstruction

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.3.e3

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models described and figured in the following publication: Shiraishi N et al. Morphology and morphometry of the human embryonic brain: A three-dimensional analysis NeuroImage 115, 2015, 96-103, DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.04.044.

      

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Published in Volume 01, Issue 03 (2015)

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The endocranial cast of Microchoerus erinaceus (Euprimates, Tarsiiformes).
Maëva Orliac
Keywords: endocast; late Eocene; Omomyiformes; Primate

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.3.e4

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D model described and figured in the following publication: Ramdarshan A., Orliac M.J., 2015. Endocranial morphology of Microchoerus erinaceus (Euprimates, Tarsiiformes) and early evolution of the Euprimates brain. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. doi: 10.1002/ajpa.22868

      

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Published in Volume 01, Issue 03 (2015)

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3D models related to the publication: Morphogenesis of the inner ear at different stages of normal human development
Saki Toyoda, Naoto Shiraki, Shigehito Yamada, Chigako Uwabe, Hirohiko Imai, Tetsuya Matsuda, Akio Yoneyama, Tohoru Takeda and Tetsuya Takakuwa
Keywords: human embryo; human inner ear; magnetic resonance imaging; phase-contrast X-ray CT; three-dimensional reconstruction

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.3.e6

  Abstract

    The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D models analyzed in: Toyoda S et al., 2015, Morphogenesis of the inner ear at different stages of normal human development. The Anatomical Record. doi : 10.1002/ar.23268 

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    Homo sapiens KC-CS17IER29248 View specimen

    M3#36_KC-CS17IER29248

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS17IER29248) at Carnegie Stage 17 (Crown Rump Length= 7mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf36  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS18IER17746 View specimen

    M3#37_KC-CS18IER17746

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS18IER17746) at Carnegie Stage 18 (Crown Rump Length= 12mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf37  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS19IER16127 View specimen

    M3#38_KC-CS19IER16127

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS19IER16127) at Carnegie Stage 19 (Crown Rump Length= 13mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf38  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS20IER20268 View specimen

    M3#39_KC-CS20IER20268

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS20IER20268) at Carnegie Stage 20 (Crown Rump Length= 13.7mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf39  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS21IER28066 View specimen

    M3#40_KC-CS21IER28066

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS21IER28066) at Carnegie Stage 21 (Crown Rump Length= 16.7mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf40  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS22IER35233 View specimen

    M3#41_KC-CS22IER35233

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS22IER35233) at Carnegie Stage 22 (Crown Rump Length= 22mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf41  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS23IER15919 View specimen

    M3#42_KC-CS23IER15919

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS23IER15919) at Carnegie Stage 23 (Crown Rump Length= 32.3mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf42  




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    Homo sapiens KC-FIER52730 View specimen

    M3#43_KC-FIER52730

    Computationally reconstructed human membranous labyrinth in post embryonic phase (KC-FIER52730). Crown Rump Length: 43.5mm.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf43  




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Published in Volume 01, Issue 03 (2015)

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3D cranium models of fossils of large canids (Canis lupus) from Goyet, Trou des Nutons and Trou Balleux, Belgium
Allowen Evin, Emmanuel Gilissen and Mietje Germonpré
Keywords: Archaeozoology; Dog; Domestication; Pleistocene; Wolf

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.3.e2

  Abstract

    Archaeozoological studies are increasingly using new methods and approaches to explore questions about domestication. Here, we provide 3D models of three archaeological Canis lupus skulls from Belgium originating from the sites of Goyet (31,680±250BP; 31,890+240/-220BP), Trou des Nutons (21,810±90BP) and Trou Balleux (postglacial). Since their identification as either wolves or early dogs is still debated, we present these models as additional tools for further investigating their evolutionary history and the history of dog domestication. 

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    Canis lupus Goyet 2860 View specimen

    M3#21_Goyet 2860

    3D surface model of the cranium of the Late Pleistocene Canis lupus "Goyet 2860" from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf21  




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    Canis lupus Trou Balleux no-nr View specimen

    M3#22_Trou Balleux no-nr

    3D surface model of the cranium of the Late Pleistocene Canis lupus "Trou Balleux no-nr" from the University of Liège, Belgium

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf22  




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    Canis lupus Trou des Nutons 2559-1 View specimen

    M3#23_Trou des Nutons 2559-1

    3D surface model of the cranium of the Late Pleistocene Canis lupus "Trou des Nutons 2559-1" from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf23  




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Published in Volume 01, Issue 03 (2015)

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3D model related to the publication: A pangolin (Manidae, Pholidota, Mammalia) from the French Quercy phosphorites (Pech du Fraysse, Saint-Projet, Tarn-et-Garonne, late Oligocene, MP 28)
Jean-Yves Crochet, Lionel Hautier and Thomas Lehmann
Keywords: Oligocene; Pangolin; Pech du Fraysse; Quercy Phosphorites

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.3.e1

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D model described and figured in the following publication: Crochet, J.-Y., Hautier, L., Lehmann, T., 2015. A pangolin (Manidae, Pholidota, Mammalia) from the French Quercy phosphorites (Pech du Fraysse, Saint-Projet, Tarn-et-Garonne, late Oligocene, MP 28). Palaeovertebrata 39(2)-e4. doi: 10.18563/pv.39.2.e4  

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Published in Volume 01, Issue 03 (2015)

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3D models related to the publication: Morphogenesis of the stomach during the human embryonic period
Ami Nako, Norihito Kaigai, Naoto Shiraki, Shigehito Yamada, Chigako Uwabe, Katsumi Kose and Tetsuya Takakuwa
Keywords: human embryo; human stomach; magnetic resonance imaging; three-dimensional reconstruction

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.4.e3

  Abstract

    The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D models analyzed in: Kaigai N et al. Morphogenesis and three-dimensional movement of the stomach during the human embryonic period, Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2014 May;297(5):791-797. doi: 10.1002/ar.22833. 

  Specimens

    Homo sapiens KC-CS16STM27159 View specimen

    M3#56_KC-CS16STM27159

    computationally reconstructed stomach of the human embryo (M3#56_KC-CS16STM27159) at Carnegie Stage 16 (Crown Rump Length= 9.9mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf56  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS17STM20383 View specimen

    M3#57_KC-CS17STM20383

    computationally reconstructed stomach of the human embryo (M3#57_KC-CS17STM20383) at Carnegie Stage 17 (Crown Rump Length= 12.3mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf57  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS18STM21807 View specimen

    M3#58_KC-CS18STM21807

    computationally reconstructed stomach of the human embryo (M3#58_KC-CS18STM21807) at Carnegie Stage 18 (Crown Rump Length= 14.7mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf58  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS19STM17998 View specimen

    M3#59_KC-CS19STM17998

    computationally reconstructed stomach of the human embryo (M3#59_KC-CS19STM17998) at Carnegie Stage 19 (Crown Rump Length was unmeasured ).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf59  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS20STM20785 View specimen

    M3#60_KC-CS20STM20785

    computationally reconstructed stomach of the human embryo (M3#60_KC-CS20STM20785) at Carnegie Stage 20 (Crown Rump Length= 18.7 mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf60  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS21STM24728 View specimen

    M3#61_KC-CS21STM24728

    computationally reconstructed stomach of the human embryo (M3#61_KC-CS21STM24728) at Carnegie Stage 21 (Crown Rump Length= 20.9 mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf61  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS22STM26438 View specimen

    M3#62_KC-CS22STM26438

    computationally reconstructed stomach of the human embryo (M3#62_KC-CS22STM26438) at Carnegie Stage 22 (Crown Rump Length= 21.5 mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf62  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS23STM20018 View specimen

    M3#63_KC-CS23STM20018

    computationally reconstructed stomach of the human embryo (M3#63_KC-CS23STM20018) at Carnegie Stage 23 (Crown Rump Length= 23.1 mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    doi: 10.18563/m3.sf63  




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Published in Volume 01, Issue 04 (2016)

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3D models related to the publication: Morphological and functional changes in the vertebral column with increasing aquatic adaptation in crocodylomorphs
Julia Molnar, Stephanie Pierce, Bhart-Anjan Bhullar, Alan Turner and John Hutchinson
Keywords: archosaur; axial skeleton; vertebrae

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.3.e5

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models described and figured in the following publication: Molnar, JL, Pierce, SE, Bhullar, B-A, Turner, AH, Hutchinson, JR (accepted). Morphological and functional changes in the crocodylomorph vertebral column with increasing aquatic adaptation. Royal Society Open Science. 

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Published in Volume 01, Issue 03 (2015)

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3D model related to the publication: An enigmatic aquatic snake from the Cenomanian of northern South America
Adriana Albino, Jorge Carrillo-Briceño and James Neenan
Keywords: Aquatic; Cretaceous; Snake; South America; vertebrae

doi: 10.18563/m3.2.2.e2

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D model described and figured in the following publication: Albino, A., Carrillo-Briceño, J. D. & Neenan, J. M. 2016. An enigmatic aquatic snake from the Cenomanian of northern South America. PeerJ 4:e2027 http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.2027 

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in press

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Skeletogenesis during the late embryonic development of the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula (Chondrichthyes; Neoselachii)
Sébastien Enault, Sylvain Adnet and Mélanie Debiais-Thibaud
Keywords: Chondrichthyes; development; mineralization; Scyliorhinus canicula; skeleton

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.4.e2

  Abstract

    Current knowledge on the skeletogenesis of Chondrichthyes is scarce compared with their extant sister group, the bony fishes. Most of the previously described developmental tables in Chondrichthyes have focused on embryonic external morphology only. Due to its small body size and relative simplicity to raise eggs in laboratory conditions, the small-spotted catshark Scyliorhinus canicula has emerged as a reference species to describe developmental mechanisms in the Chondrichthyes lineage. Here we investigate the dynamic of mineralization in a set of six embryonic specimens using X-ray microtomography and describe the developing units of both the dermal skeleton (teeth and dermal scales) and endoskeleton (vertebral axis). This preliminary data on skeletogenesis in the catshark sets the first bases to a more complete investigation of the skeletal developmental in Chondrichthyes. It should provide comparison points with data known in osteichthyans and could thus be used in the broader context of gnathostome skeletal evolution. 

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Published in Volume 01, Issue 04 (2016)

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3D models related to the publication: The hidden teeth of sloths: evolutionary vestiges and the development of a simplified dentition.
Lionel Hautier, Helder Gomes Rodrigues, Guillaume Billet and Robert J. Asher
Keywords: homology; ontogeny; sloths; vestigial teeth

doi: 10.18563/m3.2.2.e1

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models described and figured in the following publication:  Hautier L., Gomes Rodrigues H., Billet G., Asher R.J., 2016. The hidden teeth of sloths: evolutionary vestiges and the development of a simplified dentition. Scientific Reports. doi: 10.1038/srep27763 

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in press

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3D models related to the publication: Neogene sloth assemblages (Mammalia, Pilosa) of the Cocinetas Basin (La Guajira, Colombia): implications for the Great American Biotic Interchange
Eli Amson, Juan D. Carrillo and Carlos Jaramillo
Keywords: Great American Biotic Interchange; Neotropics; palaeobiodiversity; Tardigrada; Ware Formation

doi: 10.18563/m3.2.1.e3

  Abstract

    The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D models analyzed in Neogene sloth assemblages (Mammalia, Pilosa) of the Cocinetas Basin (La Guajira, Colombia): implications for the Great American Biotic Interchange. Palaeontology. doi: 10.1111/pala.12244
      

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Published in Volume 02, Issue 01 (2016)

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S.I. Data
3D models related to the publication: Morphogenesis of the liver during the human embryonic period
Ayumi Hirose, Takashi Nakashima, Naoto Shiraki, Shigehito Yamada, Chigako Uwabe, Katsumi Kose and Tetsuya Takakuwa
Keywords: human embryo; human liver; magnetic resonance imaging; three-dimensional reconstruction

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.4.e1

  Abstract

    The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D models analyzed in: Hirose, A., Nakashima, T., Yamada, S., Uwabe, C., Kose, K., Takakuwa, T. 2012. Embryonic liver morphology and morphometry by magnetic resonance microscopic imaging.  Anat Rec (Hoboken) 295, 51-59. doi: 10.1002/ar.21496 

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Published in Volume 01, Issue 04 (2016)

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3D models related to the publication: Internal tooth structure and burial practices: insights into the Neolithic necropolis of Gurgy (France, 5100-4000 cal. BC).
Mona Le Luyer, Michael Coquerelle, Stéphane Rottier and Priscilla Bayle
Keywords: modern humans; Neolithic; upper permanent second molars

doi: 10.18563/m3.2.1.e1

  Abstract

    The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D models of external and internal aspects of human upper permanent second molars from the Neolithic necropolis analyzed in the following publication: Le Luyer M., Coquerelle M., Rottier S., Bayle P. (2016): Internal tooth structure and burial practices: insights into the Neolithic necropolis of Gurgy (France, 5100-4000 cal. BC). Plos One 11(7): e0159688. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159688

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Published in Volume 02, Issue 01 (2016)

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