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3D models related to the publication: New data on Amynodontidae (Mammalia, Perissodactyla) from the Eocene of Eastern Europe: phylogenetic and palaeobiogeographic implications
Jérémy Tissier, Damien Becker, Vlad Codrea, Loïc Costeur, Cristina Fărcaş, Alexandru Solomon, Marton Venczel and Olivier Maridet
Keywords: Amynodontidae; late Eocene; Oligocene; Rhinocerotoidea; Romania

doi: 10.18563/m3.3.4.e5

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models described and figured in the following publication: Tissier et al. (in prep.). 

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Published in Volume 03, Issue 04 (2017)

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3D model related to the publication: The endocranial anatomy of the stem turtle Naomichelys speciosa from the Early Cretaceous of North America
Ariana Paulina-Carabajal, Juliana Sterli and Ingmar Werneburg
Keywords: brain endocast; inner ear; micro computed tomography; morphology; Testudinata

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.99

  Abstract

    The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D model analyzed in the following publication: Paulina-Carabajal, A., Sterli, J., Werneburg, I., 2019. The endocranial anatomy of the stem turtle Naomichelys speciosa from the Early Cretaceous of North America. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, https://doi.org/10.4202/app.00606.2019 

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Published in Volume 05, issue 04 (2019)

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The petrosal bone of Prodremotherium sp. (Artiodactyla, Ruminantia).
Alexandre Assemat and Nicolas Brualla
Keywords: Late Oligocene; MP 26; MP 28; periotic bone; ruminant

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.2.e1

  Abstract

    This project presents the 3D models of two isolated petrosals from the Oligocene locality of Pech de Fraysse (Quercy, France) here attributed to the genus Prodremotherium Filhol, 1877. Our aim is to describe the petrosal morphology of this Oligocene “early ruminant” as only few data are available in the literature for Oligocene taxa. 

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Published in Vol. 01, Issue 02 (2015)

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3D models related to the publication: The petrosal and bony labyrinth of Diplobune minor, an enigmatic Artiodactyla from the Oligocene of Western Europe
Maëva Orliac, Ricardo Araújo and Fabrice Lihoreau
Keywords: Anoplotheriidae; bony labyrinth; Quercy Phosphorites

doi: 10.18563/m3.3.1.e3

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models described and figured in the publication entitled "The petrosal and bony labyrinth of Diplobune minor, an enigmatic Artiodactyla from the Oligocene of Western Europe" by Orliac, Araújo, and Lihoreau published in Journal of Morphology (Orliac et al. 2017) https://doi.org/10.1002/jmor.20702.
      

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Published in Volume 03, Issue 01 (2017)

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S.I. Data
3D models related to the publication: Systematic and locomotor diversification of the Adapis group (Primates, Adapiformes) in the late Eocene of the Quercy (Southwest France), revealed by humeral remains.
Judit Marigó, Nicole Verrière and Marc Godinot
Keywords: Adapis; humeri; locomotion; Quercy

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.75

  Abstract

    The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D models analyzed in the publication “Systematic and locomotor diversification of the Adapis group (Primates, Adapiformes) in the late Eocene of the Quercy (Southwest France), revealed by humeral remains”. In this paper, twenty humeral specimens from the old and new Quercy collections attributed to the fossil primates Adapis and Palaeolemur are described and analysed together. In this dataset only the scans of the fossils belonging to the collections of Université de Montpellier are provided.
    In our paper (Marigó et al., 2019) we provide a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the different humeri, revealing that high variability is present within the “Adapis group” sample. Six different morphotypes are identified, confirming that what has often been called “Adapis parisiensis” is a mix of different species that present different locomotor adaptations. 

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Published in Volume 04, issue 03 (2018)

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3D models related to the publication: Brief comment on the brain and inner ear of Giganotosaurus carolinii (Dinosauria: Theropoda) based on CT scans.
Mauro N. Nieto and Ariana Paulina-Carabajal
Keywords: Carcharodontosauridae; Cranial Endocast; CT scans; Endosseous Labyrinth; Paleoneurology

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.108

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models described and figured in the following publication: Paulina-Carabajal, A. and Nieto, M. N. In press. Brief comment on the brain and inner ear of Giganotosaurus carolinii (Dinosauria: Theropoda) based on CT scans. Ameghiniana. https://doi.org/10.5710/AMGH.25.10.2019.3237
      

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in press

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Osteological connexions of the petrosal bone of the extant Hippopotamidae Hippopotamus amphibius and Choeropsis liberiensis
Maëva Orliac, Franck Guy and Renaud Lebrun
Keywords: Artiodactyla; bulla; ear region; pygmy hippo; sinus

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.1.e1

  Abstract

    This project presents the osteological connexions of the petrosal bone of the extant Hippopotamidae Hippopotamus amphibius and Choeropsis liberiensis by a virtual osteological dissection of the ear region. The petrosal, the bulla, the sinuses and the major morphological features surrounding the petrosal bone are labelled, both in situ and in an exploded model presenting disassembly views. The directional underwater hearing mode of Hippopotamidae is discussed based on the new observations. 

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Published in Vol. 01, Issue 01 (2015)

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3D models related to the publication: Morphogenesis of the inner ear at different stages of normal human development
Saki Toyoda, Naoto Shiraki, Shigehito Yamada, Chigako Uwabe, Hirohiko Imai, Tetsuya Matsuda, Akio Yoneyama, Tohoru Takeda and Tetsuya Takakuwa
Keywords: human embryo; human inner ear; magnetic resonance imaging; phase-contrast X-ray CT; three-dimensional reconstruction

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.3.e6

  Abstract

    The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D models analyzed in: Toyoda S et al., 2015, Morphogenesis of the inner ear at different stages of normal human development. The Anatomical Record. doi : 10.1002/ar.23268 

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    Homo sapiens KC-CS17IER29248 View specimen

    M3#36_KC-CS17IER29248

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS17IER29248) at Carnegie Stage 17 (Crown Rump Length= 7mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf36  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS18IER17746 View specimen

    M3#37_KC-CS18IER17746

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS18IER17746) at Carnegie Stage 18 (Crown Rump Length= 12mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf37  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS19IER16127 View specimen

    M3#38_KC-CS19IER16127

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS19IER16127) at Carnegie Stage 19 (Crown Rump Length= 13mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf38  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS20IER20268 View specimen

    M3#39_KC-CS20IER20268

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS20IER20268) at Carnegie Stage 20 (Crown Rump Length= 13.7mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf39  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS21IER28066 View specimen

    M3#40_KC-CS21IER28066

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS21IER28066) at Carnegie Stage 21 (Crown Rump Length= 16.7mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf40  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS22IER35233 View specimen

    M3#41_KC-CS22IER35233

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS22IER35233) at Carnegie Stage 22 (Crown Rump Length= 22mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf41  




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    Homo sapiens KC-CS23IER15919 View specimen

    M3#42_KC-CS23IER15919

    Computationally reconstructed membranous labyrinth of a human embryo (KC-CS23IER15919) at Carnegie Stage 23 (Crown Rump Length= 32.3mm).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf42  




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    Homo sapiens KC-FIER52730 View specimen

    M3#43_KC-FIER52730

    Computationally reconstructed human membranous labyrinth in post embryonic phase (KC-FIER52730). Crown Rump Length: 43.5mm.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf43  




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Published in Volume 01, Issue 03 (2015)

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Skeletogenesis during the late embryonic development of the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula (Chondrichthyes; Neoselachii)
Sébastien Enault, Sylvain Adnet and Mélanie Debiais-Thibaud
Keywords: Chondrichthyes; development; mineralization; Scyliorhinus canicula; skeleton

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.4.e2

  Abstract

    Current knowledge on the skeletogenesis of Chondrichthyes is scarce compared with their extant sister group, the bony fishes. Most of the previously described developmental tables in Chondrichthyes have focused on embryonic external morphology only. Due to its small body size and relative simplicity to raise eggs in laboratory conditions, the small-spotted catshark Scyliorhinus canicula has emerged as a reference species to describe developmental mechanisms in the Chondrichthyes lineage. Here we investigate the dynamic of mineralization in a set of six embryonic specimens using X-ray microtomography and describe the developing units of both the dermal skeleton (teeth and dermal scales) and endoskeleton (vertebral axis). This preliminary data on skeletogenesis in the catshark sets the first bases to a more complete investigation of the skeletal developmental in Chondrichthyes. It should provide comparison points with data known in osteichthyans and could thus be used in the broader context of gnathostome skeletal evolution. 

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Published in Volume 01, Issue 04 (2016)

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3D cranium models of fossils of large canids (Canis lupus) from Goyet, Trou des Nutons and Trou Balleux, Belgium
Allowen Evin, Emmanuel Gilissen and Mietje Germonpré
Keywords: Archaeozoology; Dog; Domestication; Pleistocene; Wolf

doi: 10.18563/m3.1.3.e2

  Abstract

    Archaeozoological studies are increasingly using new methods and approaches to explore questions about domestication. Here, we provide 3D models of three archaeological Canis lupus skulls from Belgium originating from the sites of Goyet (31,680±250BP; 31,890+240/-220BP), Trou des Nutons (21,810±90BP) and Trou Balleux (postglacial). Since their identification as either wolves or early dogs is still debated, we present these models as additional tools for further investigating their evolutionary history and the history of dog domestication. 

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    Canis lupus Goyet 2860 View specimen

    M3#21_Goyet 2860

    3D surface model of the cranium of the Late Pleistocene Canis lupus "Goyet 2860" from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf21  




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    Canis lupus Trou Balleux no-nr View specimen

    M3#22_Trou Balleux no-nr

    3D surface model of the cranium of the Late Pleistocene Canis lupus "Trou Balleux no-nr" from the University of Liège, Belgium

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf22  




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    Canis lupus Trou des Nutons 2559-1 View specimen

    M3#23_Trou des Nutons 2559-1

    3D surface model of the cranium of the Late Pleistocene Canis lupus "Trou des Nutons 2559-1" from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf23  




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Published in Volume 01, Issue 03 (2015)

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3D models related to the publication: The Neogene record of northern South American native ungulates
Juan D. Carrillo, Eli Amson, Carlos Jaramillo, Rodolfo Sánchez, Luis Quiroz, Carlos Cuartas, Aldo F. Rincón and Marcelo Sánchez-Villagra
Keywords: Astrapotheria; Castilletes Formation; Neogene; Notoungulata; San Gregorio Formation

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.61

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models described and figured in: The Neogene record of northern South American native ungulates. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. Doi: 10.5479/si.1943-6688.101
      

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Published in Volume 04, issue 02 (2018)

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3D model related to the publication: Niche partitioning of the European carnivorous mammals during the paleogene.
Floréal Solé, Morgane Dubied, Kévin Le Verger and Bastien Mennecart
Keywords: anatomy; France; juvenile; Oligocene; skull

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.63

  Abstract

    The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D model analyzed in the following publication: Solé et al. (2018), Niche partitioning of the European carnivorous mammals during the paleogene. Palaios. https://doi.org/10.2110/palo.2018.022 

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    Hyaenodon leptorhynchus FSL848325 View specimen

    M3#336_FSL848325

    The specimen FSL848325 is separated in two fragments: the anterior part bears the incisors, the deciduous and permanent canines, while the posterior part bears the right P3, P4, M1 and M2. The P2 is isolated. When combined, the cranium length is approximatively 10.5 cm long. The anterior part is 6.9 cm long and 2.15 cm wide (taken at the level of the P1). The posterior part is 4.8 cm long. The anterior part of the cranium is very narrow.

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf.336  




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Published in Volume 05, issue 01 (2019)

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3D model related to the publication: A platyrrhine talus from the early Miocene of Peru (Amazonian Madre de Dios Sub-Andean Zone)
Laurent Marivaux, Rodolfo Salas-Gismondi and Pierre-Olivier Antoine
Keywords: Cebidae Cebinae; Neogene; Primates; South America; Tarsal bone

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.85

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D model of the fossil talus of a small-bodied anthropoid primate (Platyrrhini, Cebidae, Cebinae) discovered from lower Miocene deposits of Peruvian Amazonia (MD-61 locality, Upper Madre de Dios Basin). This fossil was described and figured in the following publication: Marivaux et al. (2012), A platyrrhine talus from the early Miocene of Peru (Amazonian Madre de Dios Sub-Andean Zone). Journal of Human Evolution.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhevol.2012.07.005  

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Published in Volume 05, issue 01 (2019)

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3D models related to the publication: Early Evolution of the Ossicular Chain in Cetacea: Into the Middle Ear Gears of a Semi-Aquatic Protocetid Whale
Mickaël Mourlam and Maëva Orliac
Keywords: archaeocete; incus; malleus; Stapes

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.94

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models of the ossicles of a protocetid archaeocete from the locality of Kpogamé, Togo, described and figured in the publication of Mourlam and Orliac (2019). 

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Published in Volume 05, issue 04 (2019)

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3D models related to the publication: The ossicular chain of Cainotheriidae (Mammalia, Artiodactyla)
 
Alexandre Assemat, Mickaël Mourlam and Maëva . Orliac
Keywords: Caenomeryx; incus; Late Oligocene; malleus; Stapes

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.110

  Abstract

    This contribution includes the 3D models of the reconstructed ossicular chain of the cainotheriid Caenomeryx filholi from the late Oligocene locality of Pech Desse (MP28, Quercy, France) described and figured in the publication of Assemat et al. (2020). It represents the oldest ossicular chain reconstruction for a Paleogene terrestrial artiodactyl species. 

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in press

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3D models related to the publication: Djebelemur, a tiny pre-tooth-combed primate from the Eocene of Tunisia: a glimpse into the origin of crown strepsirhines.
Laurent Marivaux, Renaud Lebrun and Rodolphe Tabuce
Keywords: Africa; Djebelemuridae; Paleogene; Primates; Strepsirhini

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.77

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models of the fossil remains (maxilla, dentary, and talus) attributed to Djebelemur martinezi, a ca. 50 Ma primate from Tunisia (Djebel Chambi), described and figured in the following publication: Marivaux et al. (2013), Djebelemur, a tiny pre-tooth-combed primate from the Eocene of Tunisia: a glimpse into the origin of crown strepsirhines. PLoS ONE. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0080778  

  Specimens

    Djebelemur martinezi CBI-1-545 View specimen

    M3#364_CBI-1-545

    Right Talus

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf.364  




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    Djebelemur martinezi CBI-1-565-577-587-580 View specimen

    M3#366_CBI-1-565-577-587-580

    - CBI-1-565, a damaged right mandible, which consists of three isolated pieces found together and reassembled here: the anterior part of the dentary bears the p3 and m1, and alveoli for p4, p2 and c, while the posterior part preserves m3 and a portion of the ascending ramus; the m2 was found isolated but in the same small calcareous block treated by acid processing. - CBI-1-577, isolated right lower p4. - CBI-1-587, isolated left lower p2 (reversed). - CBI-1-580, isolated left lower canine (reversed).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf.366  




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    Djebelemur martinezi CBI-1-544 View specimen

    M3#365_CBI-1-544

    CBI-1-544, left maxilla preserving P3-M3 and alveoli for P2 and C1

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf.365  




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    Djebelemur martinezi CBI-1-567 View specimen

    M3#363_CBI-1-567

    Isolated left upper P4

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf.363  




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Published in Volume 04, issue 03 (2018)

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S.I. Data
Supplemental information for "Sensory anatomy of the most aquatic of carnivorans: the Antarctic Ross seal, and convergences with other mammals".
Ashley E. Latimer, Cleopatra M. Loza, Marcelo Sánchez-Villagra and Alfredo A. Carlini
Keywords: aquatic; inner ear; Ommatophoca rossi; Phoca; semicircular canals

doi: 10.18563/m3.3.4.e7

  Abstract

    Here, the semicircular canals of the most aquatic seal, the rare Antarctic Ross Seal (Ommatophoca rossii), are presented for the first time, along with representatives of every species in the Lobodontini: the leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii), and crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophagus). Because encounters with wild Ross seal are rare, and few specimens are available in collections worldwide, this dataset increases accessibility to a rare species. For further comparison, we present the bony labyrinths of other carnivorans, the elephant seal (Mirounga leonina), harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), walrus (Odobenus rosmarus), South American sea lion (Otaria byronia). 

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Published in Volume 03, Issue 04 (2017)

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3D model and accompanying dataset related to the publication: A new, exceptionally preserved juvenile specimen of Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi (Diapsida) and implications for Mesozoic marine diapsid phylogeny
Torsten M. Scheyer, James, M. Neenan, Timea Bodogan, Heinz Furrer, Christian Obrist and Mathieu Plamondon
Keywords: Ladinian; marine reptiles; osteology; postcranium; Prosanto Formation; Switzerland

doi: 10.18563/m3.3.3.e2

  Abstract

    The present contribution contains the 3D model and dataset analyzed in the following publication: Scheyer, T. M., J. M. Neenan, T. Bodogan, H. Furrer, C. Obrist, and M. Plamondon. 2017. A new, exceptionally preserved juvenile specimen of Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi (Diapsida) and implications for Mesozoic marine diapsid phylogeny. Scientific Reports, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-04514-x

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Published in Volume 03, Issue 03 (2017)

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3D models related to the publication: Dental remains of cebid platyrrhines from the earliest late Miocene of Western Amazonia, Peru: macroevolutionary implications on the extant capuchin and marmoset lineages
Laurent Marivaux, Rodolfo Salas-Gismondi and Pierre-Olivier Antoine
Keywords: Callitrichinae; Cebinae; Neogene; Primates; South America

doi: 10.18563/m3.3.1.e4

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D models of the isolated teeth attributed to stem representatives of the Cebuella and Cebus lineages (Cebuella sp. and Cebus sp.), described and figured in the following publication: Marivaux et al. (2016), Dental remains of cebid platyrrhines from the earliest late Miocene of Western Amazonia, Peru: macroevolutionary implications on the extant capuchin and marmoset lineages. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.23052 

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Published in Volume 03, Issue 01 (2017)

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S.I. Data
3D model related to the publication: The cranium of Proviverra typica (Mammalia, Hyaenodonta) and its impact on hyaenodont phylogeny and endocranial evolution
Morgane Dubied, Bastien Mennecart and Floréal Solé
Keywords: brain; microtomography; middle Eocene; Proviverrinae; skull

doi: 10.18563/journal.m3.74

  Abstract

    This contribution contains the 3D model described and figured in the following publication: Dubied, M., Mennecart, B. and Solé, F. 2019. The cranium of Proviverra typica (Mammalia, Hyaenodonta) and its impact on hyaenodont phylogeny and endocranial evolution. Palaeontology. https://doi.org/10.1111/pala.12437 

  Specimens

    Proviverra typica NMB Em18 View specimen

    M3#355_NMB Em18

    The file contain the cranium (yellow) and the endocast (blue) of the facial part and the brain case part of the type specimen of Proviverra typica (NMB Em18).

    Type: "3D_surfaces"

    3D view: doi: 10.18563/m3.sf.355  




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Published in Volume 05, issue 03 (2019)

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